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Apple II II+ aka Plus - 16K Language Card

 
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MacOS
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:48 pm    Post subject: Apple II II+ aka Plus - 16K Language Card Reply with quote

I have a third party Apple II 16K / Language Card. There is a connector cable for a port on the Logic Board of the Apple - looks like I need to replace a Hardware RAM module with it to activate the language card ?.

Question is this card for use with Apple II¥s only or also Apple //e¥s ?
Info The card is for use in Apple II and Apple II+ aka Plus.

Question wich port do I need to use to connect the Language Card to the Logic board?
Info The Language Card needs to be pluged into the Port 0 on an Apple II or II+ aka Plus.

Question wich Hardware RAM module do I need to replace with the card¥s cable?
Info RAM module on socket E3 on an Apple II or II+ main logic board.



In the following article of how to replace this card with an original Apple Language Card I found this Info:

(Location E3 is in the left rear corner of the outlined memory area and
was used for the cable header on the old Language Card...


Here a (bad) picture of an Apple II+ logic board. Sadly the area names are not to read Cry
Port 0 on the board is the first left port on the board head.
Socked E3 is the free white top socked in the left rear corner of the white outlined memory area in the middle of the board.



I found this informations about the original Apple II Language Card at apple. com
Quote:
Apple II Language Card - Version II (without RAM socket connector )

Effective immediately, Apple is substituting a different Apple II Language
Card for the original one. The new card is smaller and no longer includes the connector that plugs into the RAM socket. It also does not contain the
Autostart ROM. Now, when Apple II Language Cards are exchanged, Apple will
include a 16K RAM chip with the replacement module.

- When you install a new Language Card into an Apple II or Apple II+ system,
you need to install the 16K RAM chip into the vacant RAM socket on the
main logic board.

- In the unlikely event that customers do not already have the Autostart
ROM in their Apple II systems, they will need to purchase one for you to
install in location F8 on the main logic board. The Autostart ROM (p/n
342-0020) can be ordered from the price pages.

- Refer to the Apple II Family Technical Procedures for instructions on
installing Autostart ROMs and the 16K RAM.

INSTALLATION
------------
WARNING: Be sure the power is off before installing or removing any modules
or components, or before connecting or disconnecting any peripheral devices.
Failure to do so may result in damage to the computer, module, components,
and/or peripheral.

Remember to follow basic ESD precautions when installing, removing, or
troubleshooting modules.

1) Insert the Language Card into slot 0, component side facing away from
power supply.

2) Insert a 16K RAM chip (p/n 334-0002) at location E3 on the motherboard.
(Location E3 is in the left rear corner of the outlined memory area and
was used for the cable header on the old Language Card).

Apple II Standard Computers without Autostart ROM on Motherboard:

1) Replace the Monitor ROM (p/n 342-0004) with an Autostart ROM
(p/n 342-0020) at location F8-ROM on the motherboard.

TESTING
-------
The new language card can be tested with your existing Apple II Product
Diagnostics Disk.

1) Install the new Language Card in slot 0. Ensure that you've inserted a
RAM at location E3 and that the motherboard F8 ROM is p/n 342-0020.

2) Start up the Apple II Product Diagnostics Disk.

3) Press the <ESC> key to move the cursor to the CARD TESTS line on the
main menu, then press <RETURN>.

4) Press the <ESC> key to move the cursor to the LANGUAGE CARD line on the
CARD test menu, then press <RETURN>.

If any RAM is highlighted in inverse video, replace the Language Card. If
any of the status states are bad, then replace the Language Card. If the
message "NO ERRORS ENCOUNTERED" appears, then the ROM at Location F8 is good. If the message "CAN NOT MATCH CODE" appears, then the ROM at F8 is bad and must be replaced.

Motherboard RAM Test
--------------------
Perform the Motherboard RAM test to ensure that the RAM at location E3 is
good.

5) Use the <ESC> key to move the cursor to the MOTHERBOARD RAM TEST line on
the main test menu, then press <RETURN>.

6) Press <RETURN> to start the test.

7) The test will end and the display will show any bad RAM in inverse video. If the display shows that the LANG CARD RAM is bad then replace the RAM at E3.

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Last edited by MacOS on Wed Mar 14, 2007 1:00 am; edited 16 times in total
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MacOS
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:22 pm    Post subject: More Infos found :-) Reply with quote

I found this informations about the mysterious language card at wikipedia.org:

Quote:
The Apple II Plus

had a total of 48 kilobytes of RAM, expandable to 64 KB by means of the language card, an expansion card that could be installed in the computer's slot 0. The Apple's 6502 microprocessor could support a maximum of 64 KB of memory, and a machine with 48 KB RAM reached this limit because of the additional 16 KB of read-only memory and I/O addresses. For this reason, the extra RAM in the language card was bank-switched over the machine's built-in ROM, allowing code loaded into the additional memory to be used as if it actually were ROM.

Users could thus load Integer BASIC into the language card from disk and switch between the Integer and Applesoft dialects of BASIC with DOS 3.3's INT and FP commands just as if they had the BASIC ROM expansion card. The language card was also required to use the UCSD Pascal and FORTRAN 77 compilers, which were released by Apple at about the same time. These ran under a non-DOS operating system called the UCSD P-System, which had its own disk format and included a "virtual machine" that allowed it to run on many different types of hardware.


And about the [internal] Language card in the Apple //e wikipedia writes:

Quote:
Apple IIe

The Apple II Plus was followed in 1983 by the Apple IIe... The IIe RAM was configured as if it were a 48K Apple II Plus with a language card; the machine had no slot 0, but instead had an auxiliary slot that for all practical purposes took the place of slot 3. The auxiliary slot could accept a 1K memory card to enable the 80-column display (the card contained only RAM; the hardware and firmware for the 80-column display was built into the Apple IIe).

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Last edited by MacOS on Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:54 am; edited 4 times in total
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:26 pm    Post subject: Using the Old Monitor with the Apple Language Card Reply with quote

Another article about the language card at apple.com
Quote:

Using the Old Monitor with the Apple Language Card
This applies to the Apple II and Apple II+.

The Apple Language Card gives you all the advantages of the Auto Start ROM
whether you have an Apple II or Apple II+. This is because there is an
Auto Start ROM on the Language Card that is used instead of the F8 ROM on the
main board. There is no way to disable this ROM if you want to use the old
monitor in an Apple II. However, there are still two ways to use the old
monitor with the Language Card.

1. Replace the Auto Start ROM on the Language Card with an old monitor ROM.
In this case, you lose the Auto Start ROM's features when you are in the BASIC
that is resident on the main board. The BASIC that is loaded into the
Language Card will still be working out of an image of the Auto Start ROM that
was loaded with the BASIC. For example, Applesoft would use the old monitor
and Integer BASIC would use the Auto start ROM.

2. This method will give you the old monitor while in the BASIC that's in the
Language Card but the BASIC on the main board will still access the Auto Start
ROM. All you need do is load an image of the old monitor into the Language
Card yourself. This is a two step process.

The hard part is to get an image of the old monitor into a DOS binary file.
First, boot DOS 3.3 on an Apple II without a Language Card. Then type:

INT
BSAVE OLDMON, A$F800, L$800

Now all you need is a program or subroutine to load the monitor into the card.
The following program fragment must be in Integer BASIC if you have an Apple
II or Applesoft if you have an Apple II+. It can be added to the HELLO or
APPLESOFT program on the DOS 3.3 Master diskette.

10 D$ = "": REM CONTROL D
20 A = PEEK ( -16255): A = PEEK ( -16255)
30 PRINT D$;"BLOAD OLDMON"
40 A = PEEK ( -16254)

The old monitor will stay there until you re-boot or reload the Language
card.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now that I am the proud owner of an Apple ][ Europlus I needed to get all missing informations about the Apple II+ Language Card. I have become more Informations:

First I wanted to know how many RAM (if) is installed on my Language Card.
Here the correspondence with William and Michael:

Question > How many RAM is actually present on my Apple ][ Europlus ?
Is there a way to get this information?


Quote:

Answer by Michael:

If it has a 16-wire ribbon cable jumper to the main board RAM area,
you can be almost certain that it is 16KB.

Look at the chips on the card. There will be at least one row
of eight identical chip types (not necessarily all made by the
same manufacturer, though).

If they have a number like 4116 or 8116, then they are 16Kbit DRAMs.
If they have a number like 4164 or 8164, then they are 64Kbit DRAMs.
If they have a number like 41256, then they are 256Kbit DRAMs.

Multiply the number of rows of eight by the bit capacity of each
DRAM and that's the RAM capacity of the card.

For example, two rows of eight 4164 chips means a 128KB card.

-michael

NadaNet networking for Apple II computers!
Home page: http://members.aol.com/MJMahon/

Answer by William:

If it has this cable, then more than likely
it also has an extra 4116 to dispell the one
on the motherboard that is removed to install
the cable into.

William Garber - garberstreet.com



Ok, after counting all the chips I now know - I have 16 Kbyte on the card.

Question > My next question was in general - for what is this language card used?

Quote:

Answer by Michael

The 16KB card was designed by Apple to allow bank-switching RAM
to overlay the built-in ROM space, which increases the amount of
directly addressable to 60KB, with an additional 4KB of sub-bank-
switched RAM (the 4KB from $C000..$CFFF is reserved for I/O).

This creates what is referred to as a 64KB Apple II that can run
ProDOS, Pascal, and many applications that can utilize the additional
RAM space. There are DOS versions that relocate themselves into the
space of the 16K card, leaving additional memory under $C000 for BASIC
to use.

Look up the documentation for the card on the web for additional
information on how to control the bank switching and write enabling
if you want to use it from your own machine language programs.

Although the 16K card (originally called the Language Card, since it
was sold with Pascal and allowed the machine to more easily support
languages other than BASIC) was developed for the Apple ][ and ][+,
it became a _de facto_ standard, so when the //e and subsequent
Apple II's were designed, the native 64KB was mapped in exactly the
same way as the 16K card.

-michael

NadaNet networking for Apple II computers!
Home page: http://members.aol.com/MJMahon/

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